Walter Forde

April on Talking Pictures TV: Laurel & Hardy, Norman Wisdom, Will Hay, Frank Randle & more.

Lots more goodies on TPTV this month for fans of classic comedy, particularly old British stuff. Here are some of the top picks…

Laurel & Hardy films continue to be shown:

Sun 08 April 19:35   Helpmates

Tue 10 Apr 18 13:35 Brats
Wed 11 Apr 18 10:15 Below Zero
Thu 12 Apr 18 11:20 Towed In A Hole
Fri 13 Apr 18 23:05 Our Relations
Sat 14 Apr 18 9:35 Below Zero
Sun 15 Apr 18 9:35 Tit for Tat Mon 16 Apr 18
4:25 Private Life Of Oliver the 8th
Tue 17 Apr 18 10:20 Pack Up Your Troubles
Tue 24 Apr 18 18:40 Sons of the Desert
Wed 25 Apr 18 18:35 Pardon Us
Mon 30 Apr 18 15:50 The Laurel-Hardy Murder Case

No new titles that haven’t been shown already, but there are rumours that some of L & H’s shorts, including their silents, are to appear soon…

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Walter Forde

 

Speaking of silents, you can see L & H co-stars Charley Chase and Mae Busch in the early Keystone comedy SETTLED AT THE SEASIDE. It’s on at 15.00 on Tuesday 10th April.  Obscure British silent comedian Walter Forde even makes an appearance! His 1922 short WALTER WANTS WORK shows on Friday 13 April at 7.50. Later a notable director of comedy and thrillers, three more of his films are airing: GASBAGS with The Crazy Gang on Thurs 12th April at 8.00, the Jimmy Durante vehicle LAND WITHOUT MUSIC on Thu 26 Apr 18 6:00, and at the beginning of May, ROME EXPRESS: Fri 04 May at 14:30.

There’s also the tail end of TPTV’s Will Hay Season, with

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‘BOYS WILL BE BOYS’ (1935). An early effort, it’s just a notch below his best and he hasn’t found stooges Moore Marriott and Graham Moffatt yet, but there are some great examples of his bumbling schoolteacher routine. You also get the amusing Claude Dampier in a supporting role. ‘BOYS WILL BE BOYS’ shows on Thursday 5th April at 10:40, and is repeated at 12pm on Sunday 8th.

 

The films of another music hall/variety legend also get an airing. The ramshackle works of Frank Randle are a whole lot less polished than the Will Hay films, and can be difficult to sit through in their entirety. Randle was an utterly fascinating comic though, a manic force of nature, and his films certainly have their moments. Often the anarchic Randle was shown in an army setting, a perfect mismatch for his contrarian persona. SOMEWHERE IN CAMP is one example, showing in the small hours of 27 April at 2.45am.  WHEN YOU COME HOME is Randle’s most polished film, a curious piece which makes him much more of an underdog. It’s on at 9.30 on Tuesday 24th April.

A later star comic, Norman Wisdom also gets a look-in with THE BULLDOG BREED at 21.00 on Weds 4th April, and UP IN THE WORLD

Also from the 1950s, there are several other British comedies, amongst them:

Wed 11 Apr 18 6:00 The Naked Truth (1957), a Terry-Thomas vehicle.

Sat 14 Apr 18 6:00 Chance of a Lifetime (1950).  Basil Radford, Bernard Miles, Kenneth More, Patrick Troughton & Hattie Jacques in the tale about the staff of an engineering firm who take over after going on strike.

Tue 17 Apr 18 14:00 Keep It Clean – Ronald Shiner comedy about a dry cleaning business.

Thu 19 Apr 18 6:00 Innocents In Paris . A great cast of comic actors, including Alastair Sim & Margaret Rutherford.

Mon 23 Apr 18 9:45 The Madame Gambles (1951). Comedy. The owner of a dress shop gambles the shop away to her bookie who inherits, not only the shop, but the manager.  Starring Richard Hearne (Mr Pastry) and Petula Clark.
Mon 23 Apr 18 11:20 The Galloping Major 1951. Director: Henry Cornelius. Stars Basil Radford, Sidney James, Jimmy Hanley & Janette Scott. A very Ealing comedy feel to this tale of a racehorse.

Sun 29Apr 18 13:50 Three Men In A Boat 1956. Laurence Harvey, Jimmy Edwards & David  Tomlinson star in this adaptation of Jerome K Jerome’s novel.

Lots more goodies, too. The full schedule is available at talkingpicturestv.co.uk/schedule . Thankyou TPTV for continuing to show such a diverse range of films!

 

 

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LOST CLOWNS: A baker’s dozen!

Fresh from a fantastic weekend in London for Kennington Bioscope’s ‘SILENT LAUGHTER SATURDAY’, the blog is now ready to launch properly. Reviews of films from the weekend to follow, but before we get to that, here’s a brief rundown of some of the greatest forgotten comics you’ll find here. Sure, we’ll be featuring Keaton, Laurel & Hardy etc, too, but these are some of the comics who need a bit more information and appreciation about them on the internet, the core purpose of this site. As time goes on, I’d like to add pages for each of these performers to the site to hopefully become a definitive reference source, but for now, here’s a brief introduction to some of my favourite lost comedians…

  1. DAN LENO

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Going right back to the music hall days, it’s impossible to conceive of many of the later British comedians without Dan Leno. His sketches and whimsy were beloved by the Karno comics, and absorbed into their acts. Just look at that bowler-hatted, vacantly grinning face and tell me you don’t see Stan Laurel. Chaplin loved Leno, too. Leno died young at the turn of the century, and has left only scraps of his act, but he left a long shadow in British comedy.

2. MAX LINDER

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Just as influential, in his own way, was Frenchman Max Linder. Stage-trained Linder made films from the mid-1900s for Pathé. These films may look primitive, with their cardboard, painted sets, but Linder’s acting is remarkably subtle and sophisticated. As a silk-hatted boulevardier, he maintains this pleasingly low-key style as he is pulled into ridiculously farcical situations, such as being carried through the streets of Paris in his bath!

Chaplin, again, was a huge fan. He became friends with Linder (below), dedicating a photo to him, “To the one and only Max, the Professor. From his disciple, Charles Chaplin.” Linder’s sophisticated, dapper style in the face of eternal embarrassment was also a huge influence on two other great silent comics, Raymond Griffith and Charley Chase.

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3. ROSCOE ARBUCKLE

circa 1920: A full-length studio portrait of the silent screen comedic actor Fatty Arbuckle (1887-1933) wearing a black hat and sticking his finger in his mouth. (Photo by Mitchell/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

It’s amazing how many of these underappreciated comedians had such an influence on the more enduring names. It was Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle, then Mack Sennett’s biggest star, who persuaded the producer not to fire a young, temperamental Chaplin. He’s also said to have provided the original tramp costume’s oversized pants. The eternally generous Arbuckle later had an even more profound impact on the young Buster Keaton,giving him his first screen roles and teaching him the ropes of film-making. On his own account, he made some really charming and funny screen comedies, before his career was unduly and unfairly stopped by a 1921 scandal. To this day, it’s impossible to write a paragraph about him without mentioning it, so I’m just going to shout from the rooftops, “HE WAS INNOCENT!” once more.

4. MABEL NORMAND

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The first really popular screen comedienne, Mabel was also a pioneering female director. From the mid 1910s, she was directing her own films at Keystone, later moving into feature films for Goldwyn. She’s great proof that women could be both funny and attractive at the same time, which was a difficult thing to achieve in such a male-dominated industry. Mabel was a wonderfully lively performer, who deserves remembering more for her pioneering work.

5. ALICE HOWELL

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Alice Howell took a more clownish approach to her humour. Her round, eternally started kewpie doll face, topped off with a mass of frizzy red hair was instantly amusing, and totally suited the ditzy characters she played on film. However, she was still a true original, almost a forerunner of Lucille Ball. Her films are sadly scarce, but reveal a uniquely funny lady. “Everyone a Howell!” was her strapline.

6. LUPINO LANE

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To see one of Lupino Lane’s films is to suspend belief in the laws of physics; he was a phenomenal acrobat who surpasses even Keaton. Tracing his family’s history in entertainment back to 1642, he was a proud inheritor of the pantomime tradition, and could do pretty much anything: acrobatics, dancing, singing, crosstalk routines, juggling. He later added starring in, writing and directing Hollywood comedies to his resumé. These films are great little two reelers, maybe not deep in characterisation, but they make up for it in a whirlwind of gags and acrobatics. Lane’s signature stunts include rising up from the splits, somersaulting down flights of stairs, and running 360 degrees around the inside of a proscenium arch! In later years, he returned to England, where he originated the role of Bill Snibson in ‘ME AND MY GIRL’, along with the famous dance, ‘The Lambeth Walk’. He should be recognised as a national treasure in Britain, but is undeservedly forgotten.

7. CHARLEY BOWERS

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The films of Charley Bowers are as jaw-dropping as Lupino Lane’s, but for different reasons. Bowers isn’t an astounding performer, but he was an incredibly talented animator and gagman. In two series of comedies in the late 1920s, he mixed his wild, incredibly realistic stop motion animation into live action films starring himself. The results are incredible, a world where pussy willow trees sprout living cats, mice fire guns, cars hatch from eggs and the figures inside paintings come to life. Beloved by surrealists like André Breton, Bowers was just way ahead of his time, and returned to obscurity before being rediscovered in recent years.

8. HARRY LANGDON

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Langdon is usually cited as one of the “big 4” names of silent comedy, with Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd, but he’s far, far less well remembered than those performers. Part of the reaon, I think, is that he is very much an offbeat, reactionary performer, a minimalist in reaction to the overblown chaos of Mack Sennett madness. Now that we’re less familiar with this, it’s harder to place Langdon’s curious, quiet style. He played an overgrown baby of indeterminate age, his performances marked by long silences and the tiniest flinches in facial expression. He was proclaimed as the next Chaplin in his day, but crashed and burned through a combination of factors. He’s kind of a marmite performer, an acid test for your appreciation of silent comedy. Those who ‘get’ him revere him. Among them were Chaplin, Keaton and Stan Laurel. That must count for something.

9. LLOYD HAMILTON

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You might recognise the photo above from our header image. Lloyd Hamilton (on the left) is another comedian’s comedian, a reactionary type who has a similarly ‘marmite’ appeal to Harry Langdon. Playing a curious overgrown Mama’s Boy type, he walked with a prissy waddle and treated everything with disdain. A typical Hamilton film has little story, but is simply a string of disasters to showcase his fine reactionary comedy. However, he’s hamstrung (pardon the pun) by the lack of most of his best films, and the fractured and scattered nature of what remains. But, as Mack Sennett said, “[Lloyd Hamilton] had comic motion. He’d do nothing but walk across the screen and make you laugh.”

10. CHARLEY CHASE

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I simply adore Charley Chase. Debonair, charming and a multi-talented gagman, director and story-constructionist, he had a knack for creating beautiful little farce comedies that escalate to heights of absurdity yet remain completely believable throughout. For example, ‘MIGHTY LIKE A MOOSE’, in which he and his wife have plastic surgery without telling each other, meet on the street, and then embark on an affair. It’s a totally ridiculous story, yet made believable and human by the warmth and skill of Chase and his team. Chase continued doing some great, charming work in the talkies, making short films at Hal Roach studios that need to be seen more widely.

11. WALTER FORDE

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Walter Forde was once billed as ‘Britain’s only comedian!”. That’s rather stretching it, but he was the only comedian making film comedy shorts and features in Britain for most of the silent era. Forde’s work in this area continues to be undervalued, but is slowly being re-evaluated. He played a likeable chap, “two parts Chaplin, three parts Harold Lloyd,” as one reviewer put it, and directed his films himself. A shy man, he gave up performing in 1930, and instead became a renowned director of both comedies and dramas.

12. WILL HAY

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Taking Walter Forde’s place as premier comic of British films in the sound era was Will Hay. Hay’s music hall character was an incompetent ignorant schoolmaster who was barely a step ahead of his pupils. This enabled him to follow a rich line of comedy, transferable in films to any position of seedy authority: ship’s captain, shyster lawyer, policeman, or stationmaster in his all-time classic ‘OH, MR PORTER!’. Hay’s films are acknowledged as classics, but as a performer he needs some more love. he’s another superb reactionary comedian, a master of pauses, sniffs and shady glances to sell material that looks feeble on paper. He’s also one who stands up very well today, as British bureaucracy and incompetence hasn’t gone anywhere in the 65 years since his passing…

13 CLARK & McCULLOUGH

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We close with a wonderfully vibrant act who flourished in sound comedies. Clark and McCullough were successful on Broadway before making a great little series of sound two-reel shorts for RKO in the early 1930s. They are often considered Marx Brothers rip-offs (partly due to Bobby Clark’s painted-on glasses), yet turned out a brand of humour uniquely their own, rich in movement, dialogue, pantomime and farce.

As I leave off here for now, I’m already thinking of the other comics I haven’t included here today… Raymond Griffith,  Jack Hulbert, Stanley Lupino, Snub Pollard, Thelma Todd… Rest assured, they’ll all have their place here. I hope you’ll bookmark this site and keep dropping by from time to time to share these great performers with me. Next up, some highlights from ‘SILENT LAUGHTER SATURDAY’, featuring some of the names above.